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    This page contains a list of all of the tables and graphs type available on this site. Each link will take you to a description for the table or graph selected. You can use the links below the descriptions to go directly to the actual table or graph, to display the printable Quick Reference Guide for the table of graph, or to go to the tutorial material for the table or graph.

Select the table or graph you are interested in from the list below:

  Quick Profiles
  Rate/Trend Comparison
  Death Rates
  Incidence Rates
  Prevalence Projections
  5 Year Rate Changes
  Historical Trends
  Comparative Data Display
  Interactive Maps
  Screening and Risk Factors
  Demographic Data
  Peer Counties
  Cancer Knowledge
     


Quick Profiles Report

Purpose: Provides a quick look for assessing the burden and risk for a major cancer site for the US overall or for a selected state. The Quick Profile is constructed using images of a standard set of tables and graphs that both summarize mortality and incidence statistics and provide for comparisons.

Cancer statistics require careful interpretation. See the Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about State Rankings for insight into interpreting cancer statistics particularly if you are a new user of cancer statistics.

The Modify link provides access to the interactive table or graph where custom data selections (e.g., sex or race) and interactive features (e.g., sorting) are available.

Data Sources:

  • Mortality data are provided by the National Vital Statistics System at the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Incidence data are provided by the National Program of Cancer Registries Cancer Surveillance System (NPCR-CSS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.
  • Population counts for denominators in the calculation of rates and trends are provided to the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Census Bureau and use the National Center for Health Statistics file needed to bridge from the Census 2000 multiple race coding to historical groupings of race and ethnicity.
  • Rates are calculated using SEER*Stat.
  • Trends are determined by using Joinpoint analysis of available historical data and reporting the last segment as the most recent trend.
Go to Quick Profiles Graph  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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Rate/Trend Comparison Table

Purpose: Compares cancer rate changes between a county of a state and the entire state or between a state and the US. The graphic version of this table groups the data so you can see quickly if the trends are rising, falling, or remaining stable and how they compare to the selected comparison rates. Cancers that need more attention (have rising rates that are higher than the rate used for comparison) are in the top left, reddish square and are marked by a magnifying glass. Cancers that are doing the best (have falling rates that are lower than the rate used for comparison) are in the bottom right, dark green square and are marked by an apple. The non-graphical version of this table gives you the actual rates and well as the annual percentage changes as well as their 95% confidence intervals.

Rate/Trend Comparison Table by State/County
This table shows major cancer sites, rates, and trends for a user specified county compared to the entire state or for a user specified state compared to the US based on data from the National Center for Heath Statistics.
Picture of a Rate/Trend Comparison graph Picture of the table version of a Rate/Trend Comparison graph

Go to Rate/Trend Comparison Table by State/County  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

Rate/Trend Comparison Table by Cancer
This table shows the county rates and trends compared to the overall state rate or to the overall US rate based on data from the National Center for Heath Statistics.
Picture of a Rate/Trend Comparison graph Picture of the table version of a Rate/Trend Comparison graph

Go to Rate/Trend Comparison Table by Cancer  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials


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Death Rates Table

Purpose: Provide a table of mortality statistics for use in assessing the burden and risk for a major cancer site for the US overall or for a selected state and its counties or parishes. The Healthy People 2010 objective for the US is provided in order to give perspective on how favorably or unfavorably a location compares to this overall goal. The 95% Confidence Intervals for the rates and trends provide a measure of how certain or uncertain the point estimates are and can be used to generally assess how different a rate or trend is from another.

Cancer statistics require careful interpretation. See the Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about State Rankings for insight into interpreting cancer statistics particularly if you are a new user of cancer statistics.

The Quick Reference Guide provides an introduction to the interactive features of this table.

Data Sources:

  • Mortality data are provided by the National Vital Statistics System at the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Population counts for denominators in the calculation of rates and trends are provided to the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Census Bureau and use the National Center for Health Statistics file needed to bridge from the Census 2000 multiple race coding to historical groupings of race and ethnicity.
  • Rates are calculated using SEER*Stat.
  • Trends are determined by using Joinpoint analysis of available historical data and reporting the last segment as the most recent trend.

Go to Death Rates Table  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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Incidence Rates Table
Purpose: Provide a table of incidence statistics for use in assessing the burden and risk for a major cancer site for the US overall and for states with cancer registries whose data have met the criteria required for inclusion in the US Cancer Statistics. The 95% Confidence Intervals for the rates provide a measure of how certain or uncertain the point estimate is and can be used to generally assess how different one rate is from another.

Cancer statistics require careful interpretation. See the Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about State Rankings for insight into interpreting cancer statistics particularly if you are a new user of cancer statistics.

The Quick Reference Guide provides an introduction to the interactive features of this table.

Data Sources:
  • Incidence data are provided by the National Program of Cancer Registries Cancer Surveillance System (NPCR-CSS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.
  • Population counts for denominators in the calculation of rates and trends are provided to the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Census Bureau and use the National Center for Health Statistics file needed to bridge from the Census 2000 multiple race coding to historical groupings of race and ethnicity.
  • Rates are calculated using SEER*Stat.

Go to Incidence Rates Table  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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Prevalence Projections Table
Purpose: Provide a table of breast cancer prevalence projections for use in assessing the burden for the US by state.

Cancer prevalence represents persons alive at a given date who were previously diagnosed with cancer. This web site provides estimates and projections of cancer prevalence for all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia (D.C.), based on a statistical method that uses state-specific mortality data and cancer survival. The prevalence statistics presented are prevalence counts, prevalence percents and age-adjusted prevalence percents. For an overview of methods and definitions refer to http://surveillance.cancer.gov/software/prevalence.html. Incidence differs from prevalence in that it represents new cancer cases diagnosed during a given period of time, usually a year.

Complete Prevalence includes all people alive diagnosed with cancer regardless of how long ago the diagnosis was and represents cancer survivorship.

5-year Limited Duration Prevalence (also known as 5-year prevalence) includes people alive diagnosed with cancer within the past 5 years. It is a closer assessment of cancer patients’ prevalence in more intensive cancer care.

Prevalence Counts - number of people alive in a given date previously diagnosed with cancer.

Crude Prevalence Percent - percent of the population alive and previously diagnosed with cancer.

Age-Adjusted Prevalence Percent – A weighted average of the age-specific prevalence percent, where the weights are the proportions of persons in the corresponding age groups of a standard million population

Method of estimation and data sources:
Calculation of complete cancer prevalence requires several years of incidence data and accurate vital status information at end of follow-up. Five states from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program (http://seer.cancer.gov) have cases diagnosed from 1975 and allow estimation 30-year limited duration prevalence which is close to complete. Fewer years of cancer incidence are available from states funded by SEER and/or the CDC National Program for Cancer Registries (NPCR) (http://www.cdc.gov/Cancer/npcr/). Gaps in data collection prevent the calculation of cancer prevalence for many states. A statistical model is used that predicts cancer prevalence1 from state specific cancer mortality data from National Center of Health Statistics (NCHS) and cancer survival model2 adjusted to represent cancer survival in each respective state. The method has been validated against reported incidence cases for 37 states from SEER and NPCR.

1. Breast cancer survivors in the US States: geographical variability and time trends 2005-2015 De Angelis R, Tavilla A, Verdecchia A, Feuer EJ, Mariotto AB. Submitted to Cancer.

2. Mariotto A, Capocaccia R, Verdecchia A, Micheli A, Feuer EJ, Pickle L et al. Projecting SEER Cancer Survival Rates to the US: An Ecological Regression Approach. Cancer Causes and Control 2002; 13(2):101-111.

The Quick Reference Guide provides an introduction to the interactive features of this table.

Data Sources:
  • Incidence data are provided by the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.
  • Mortality data are provided by the National Vital Statistics System at the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Population counts for denominators in the calculation of rates and trends are provided to the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Census Bureau and use the National Center for Health Statistics file needed to bridge from the Census 2000 multiple race coding to historical groupings of race and ethnicity.

Go to Prevalence Projections Table  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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5 Year Rate Changes Graph
Purpose: This graph provides a quick look at which cancer sites have rising rates and which have falling rates over the most recent 5 years of data. The goal is for every cancer site to have falling mortality. Incidence is a more complex story that requires local knowledge and interpretation. For example, a successful screening program will result in a short term rise in incidence. The Historical Trends graph can be used to look at the trends in rates over up to 25 years of data.

Cancer statistics require careful interpretation. See the Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about State Rankings for insight into interpreting cancer statistics particularly if you are a new user of cancer statistics.

Note that a modest percent change in a more common cancer such as lung cancer will have a greater impact on the overall cancer burden than a larger percent change in a more rare cancer.

The annual percent change can be applied to either the rate or to the count in order to provide a rough estimate for planning purposes. For example, if the annual percent change is minus 1% and there are 500 deaths per year then it can be estimated that there will be 5 fewer deaths next year assuming the trend continues. Like compound interest, more accurate estimates require more sophisticated methods and work is in process to provide projections.

The Quick Reference Guide provides an introduction to the interactive features of this graph.

Data Sources:
  • Mortality data are provided by the National Vital Statistics System at the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Incidence data are provided by the National Program of Cancer Registries Cancer Surveillance System (NPCR-CSS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.
  • Population counts for denominators in the calculation of rates and trends are provided to the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Census Bureau and use the National Center for Health Statistics file needed to bridge from the Census 2000 multiple race coding to historical groupings of race and ethnicity.
  • 5-year annual percent change is calculated using SEER*Stat's calculation of Expected Annual Percent Change (EAPC).
Picture of a 5 Year Rate Change bar graph Picture of the table version of a 5 Year Rate Change bar graph

 Go to 5 Year Rate Changes Graph  |  View Quick Reference Guide  | View Tutorials

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Historical Trends Graph
Purpose: Use this graph to explore the relationship over time of levels and trends in cancer rates for geographic areas and for demographic subgroups. Potential health disparities can be explored to identify opportunities or to evaluate the success of prior interventions.

While useful for planning and evaluating cancer control, these trends represent an ecological analysis. An cancer epidemiologist knowledgeable about the area and its demographics and health resource utilization should assist in interpreting unexpected trends.

Cancer statistics require careful interpretation. See the Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about State Rankings for insight into interpreting cancer statistics particularly if you are a new user of cancer statistics.

The Quick Reference Guide provides an introduction to the interactive features of this graph.

Data Sources:

  • Mortality data are provided by the National Vital Statistics System at the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Incidence data are provided by the National Program of Cancer Registries Cancer Surveillance System (NPCR-CSS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.
  • Population counts for denominators in the calculation of rates and trends are provided to the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Census Bureau and use the National Center for Health Statistics file needed to bridge from the Census 2000 multiple race coding to historical groupings of race and ethnicity.
  • Trends are determined by using Joinpoint analysis.
  • Rates are calculated using SEER*Stat.
  • Trends are determined by using Joinpoint analysis of available historical data and reporting the last segment as the most recent trend.
Picture of an Historical Trend graph showing one line of data with yearly points turned on Picture of an Historical Trend graph showing multiple lines of data with yearly points turned off Pictrure of the table version of an Historical Trends graph

Go to Historical Trends Graph  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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Comparative Data Display
Purpose: Provides an interactive tool for graphically exploring relationships across geography of mortality, incidence, demographics, risk factors, or screening statistics. Either states can be compared or counties within a state. 95% confidence intervals are included so that the certainty of point estimates of rates or trends can be considered when making comparisons. The maps can be used to assess whether there is geographic clustering for the sorted column that may be useful in focusing cancer control interventions.

Cancer statistics require careful interpretation. See the Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about State Rankings for insight into interpreting cancer statistics particularly if you are a new user of cancer statistics.

The Quick Reference Guide provides an introduction to the interactive features of this graph.

Data Sources:

  • Mortality data are provided by the National Vital Statistics System at the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Incidence data are provided by the National Program of Cancer Registries Cancer Surveillance System (NPCR-CSS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.
  • Population counts for denominators in the calculation of rates and trends are provided to the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Census Bureau and use the National Center for Health Statistics file needed to bridge from the Census 2000 multiple race coding to historical groupings of race and ethnicity.
  • Rates are calculated using SEER*Stat.
  • Trends are determined by using Joinpoint analysis of available historical data and reporting the last segment as the most recent trend.
  • Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System is an annual telephone survey that provides information by state on risk factors and cancer screening. County information is not available. Not all data are provided every year so the most recent year's data are included.
  • The Healthy People 2010 objective for the US is provided as a green area on graphs for statistics for which there is a corresponding objective. This is intended to provide perspective on how favorably or unfavorably a location or demographic group compares to this overall goal.
Picture of a Rate, Percents, and Counts Graph showing one column of data Picture of a Rate, Percents, and Counts Graph showing two column of data Picture of the Overview view of a Rate, Percents, and Counts Graph showing one column of data

Go to Comparative Data Display  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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Interactive Maps

Purpose: Provide a map of mortality statistics for use in assessing the burden and risk for a major cancer site for the US overall or for a selected state and its counties or parishes. The Healthy People 2010 objective for the US is provided in the legend when appropriate in order to give perspective on how favorably or unfavorably a location compares to this overall goal. The 95% Confidence Intervals for the rates provide a measure of how certain or uncertain the point estimates are and can be used to generally assess how different a rate is from another.

Cancer statistics require careful interpretation. See the Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about State Rankings for insight into interpreting cancer statistics particularly if you are a new user of cancer statistics.

The Quick Reference Guide provides an introduction to the interactive features of this section.

Data Sources:

  • Mortality data are provided by the National Vital Statistics System at the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Population counts for denominators in the calculation of rates and trends are provided to the National Cancer Institute by the U.S. Census Bureau and use the National Center for Health Statistics file needed to bridge from the Census 2000 multiple race coding to historical groupings of race and ethnicity.
  • Rates are calculated using SEER*Stat.

Go to Interactive Maps  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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Screening and Risk Factors Table
This table shows data at the state (or in some cases county) level related to a number of screening and risk factors associated with cancer in terms of percent and the sample survey size.

Data Sources:

You can sort the data on the table by state name and percent value.

Go to Screening and Risk Factors Table   |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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Demographic Data Table
Purpose: Provide a table of expanded Census data. These statistics can be used in assessing the population characteristics of a given area. Due to data availability issues, the data for some counties are imputed from the parent county.

Go to Demographic Data Table   |   View Quick Reference Guide  |   View Tutorials

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Peer Counties Table
Purpose: Shows the relationship between a user-defined county and other counties in the same state or across the US in terms of one of a number of racial characteristics or by an NCI-defined socioeconomic status indicator. The counties included in the table are the 30 counties that are closest to the value (above or below) to the selected county by the peer basis chosen. The rank of the counties within all counties in the US is included for reference.

These data are based on Census populations as modified by the National Cancer Institute.

Go to Peer Counties Table   |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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Cancer Knowledge Maps
Purpose: Provide population estimates for variables that represent knowledge about certain cancer risk factors, screening tests, and resources. The data are sourced from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). The HINTS data collection program was created to monitor changes in the rapidly evolving field of health communication. Survey researchers are using the data to understand how adults 18 years and older use different communication channels, including the Internet, to obtain vital health information for themselves and their loved ones. Program planners are using the data to overcome barriers to health information usage across populations, and obtaining the data they need to create more effective communication strategies. Finally, social scientists are using the data to refine their theories of health communication in the information age and to offer new and better recommendations for reducing the burden of cancer throughout the population. Hints data are available for public use.

HINTS was developed by the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch (HCIRB) of the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS) as an outcome of the National Cancer Institute's Extraordinary Opportunity in Cancer Communications. To learn more about communication and informatics research at NCI, please visit the HCIRB and DCCPS Web sites.

Go to Cancer Knowledge Maps  |  View Quick Reference Guide  |  View Tutorials

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